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Hamon Glop Flat Tang Blades - Cutlery Rivets Installing Pinned Bolsters and Pinned Handles
Hidden Tangs with Guard and Pommel Corby Rivets, Soldered Guards, Tubing Corby Rivets, Slotted Guards, Tubing
Tapered Tang Blades with Pinned Guards & Handles Lockback Folder Kits Semi Finished Sheath Instructions
Kydex Forming Instructions Guard Solder Instructions Fiber Board Sharpening Wheel Instructions
Polishing Tips
For help with your knifemaking questions!
These will help you with the supplies, materials and components necessary for many knife making projects
  • Flat Tang Blades - Cutlery Rivets

    Camp and Cutlery Kits

    MATERIALS
    Blade
    Handle Material
    Cutlery Rivets
    Epoxy
    Masking Tape
    Sandpaper (200 - 600 grit)

    TOOLS
    Scribe
    Files
    Jewelers Saw
    Vise
    Drill Press
    Rivet Drills

    Procedure

    1. Select blade, gather all tools and materials necessary.

    2. Read procedure completely before you begin.

    3. Cover sharp edge of blade with masking tape. This will protect you and the blade.

    4. Lay blade on handle material and scribe to length desired. Cut, leaving a little extra to allow for shaping ends. When using a material with varied or contrasting colors (such as Dymondwood) be sure to mark the side that will go against the blade so that the handles will match.

    5. Drill handle material for rivets.

    A. Position blade on one piece of handle material, carefully scribe holes            using blade as a guide.

    B. Drill hole nearest to the blade first, drill hole at opposite end, drill center hole last.

    C. Position drilled piece of handle material on top of second piece, (be sure the sides that will be against blade tang are together). Using first holes drilled as a guide, drill holes in second piece in same order as the first piece, dropping female half of rivet into each hole as drilled to use as "slave pin".

    D. Countersink holes to desired depth, generally this is done to the thickness of the rivet head. You may want to try this on a scrap of material first, (be sure it is the same thickness as your handle material). Rivet drills are designed to drill and countersink easily and accurately, they should be used in a drill press and can be helpful in perfect alignment of holes by adjusting location of holes with the cutting tip of the rivet drill.

    6. Shape the front edge of each piece of the han- dle material, sand and polish this area before attaching to blade. (This is a difficult area to work once the blade has been attached).

    7. Insert rivets thru one piece of handle and the blade. Scribe around tang to shape of handle. Repeat with second piece, using opposite side of blade. Cut away extra material using a jewelers saw.

    8. Using 220 grit sandpaper, sand handle materi- al flat on each side that will fit against tang. Sand tang of blade with same paper. This removes any foreign material from blade and handle material and assures a good adhesion of the blade to the handle.

    9. Brush handle material and blade lightly with 2- ton epoxy. Position blade between the two pieces of handle material. Insert rivet in front hole. Using a vise, squeeze lightly till rivet begins to close, (do not squeeze completely closed). Insert rivet at opposite end in same manner. Insert center rivet, adjust all making sure they fit properly. When all are in perfect position, squeeze lightly but com- pletely closing handle material to tang. Do not squeeze out all the epoxy.

    10. Allow to dry.

    11. Using a file, a half-round, second-cut works great, shape your handle to desired shape, fitting to your hand. Sand with sandpapers, finishing with a 600 grit wet-dry, if a polished look is desired, buff with a muslin wheel and a white rouge.

    12. Remove masking tape, clean and sharpen your knife to a keen edge.

    YOUR BLADE IS READY TO USE.
  • Installing Pinned Bolsters and Pinned Handles

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR BLADES USING PINNED
    BOLSTERS AND PINNED HANDLES

    1. Select materials and tools required for your project. Read procedure carefully before beginning.

    2. Cover sharp edge of blade with masking tape. This will protect you and the blade.

    3. Using 220 grit sandpaper, sand the bolsters flat, removing any burrs that may exist on the side, make sure they will fit neatly against the tang of the blade.

    4. Fit bolsters by aligning the pin holes in the bolsters and blade. Pin the bolsters to the blade making sure pins protrude equally on both sides. Make sure bolsters are tight against the blade on each side.

    5. Clamp bolsters to blade. It is important that the bolsters remain tight against the blade during pinning. Pein the pins by placing firmly on anvil. Pein one side then the other, alternating sides until pin has swelled sufficiently inside the hole assuring a very tight fit. NOTE: While peining, check frequently to make sure the bolsters do not slip and that they remain tight against the blade. As you work down the bolster, the metals will mesh and you will not be able to see the pins at all. The bolster will appear to be one piece.

    6. Mark the side of your handle material that will fit next to tang being careful to match any color patterns that your material may contain. Mark end of each piece that will fit against bolster.

    7. Fit handle material to bolster by filing and sanding until you have a good square fit with NO GAPS or lines showing. Do both pieces.

    8. Lay blade on handle material carefully making sure it lays squarely and tightly against bolster. Scribe outline of blade onto handle, (you may want to clamp first so that handle will not slip.) Repeat with second piece of handle material using opposite side of the tang.

    9. Leaving slightly oversize, remove excess han- dle material with jewelers saw, belt sander or other means available.
    DO NOT OVERGRIND.

    10. Using 200 grit sandpaper, sand the handle material flat on the side that will fit against tang of blade. Sand tang of blade with same paper. This will remove any foreign material and assure a good adhesion of blade to handle material.

    11. Carefully attach one (1 ) piece of handle material to tang of blade with epoxy. Make sure the handle material is centered properly and that it fits perfectly against bolster with no gaps. Clamp and allow epoxy to set. You may want to allow drying overnight.

    12. Using pin holes in blade as a template, drill these holes with the proper drill bit. Be sure to drill in center of holes, drill slowly and carefully so you will not splinter handle material, (a drill press is best if available.) EXTREME CAUTION is advised when using your blade as a pattern for drilling holes. Be sure the blade and handle materials are clamped securely and the blade is protected with tape to help protect the operator from being cut or otherwise ini .ured if the drilling operation trys to twist or grab the work out of the vise.

    13. OPTIONAL THONG HOLE: If you wish to use a thong hole, drill this hole using blade hole as template.

    14. Repeat step 11 using second piece of handle material.

    15. Drill holes for pins and thong hole (if desired) as in steps 12 & 13 using holes through handle material as guides. Holes must be drilled straight and properly centered for pins to fit correctly.

    16. Insert pins through holes drilled in handle material. It may be necessary to polish your pins and thong hole tubing with emery cloth to assure they will slide in and out of the holes easily. They should be snug, but not tight enough to risk cracking the wood when pushing in or out.

    17. Mix a small amount of epoxy. Roll pins and thong hole tubing (if installing) in epoxy. Insert pins in holes. Allow to dry until set. Excess pin material will be sanded off when shaping and buffing handle.

    18. You are now ready to shape your bolster and handle into one. Power tools such as belt sanders and Dremel tools with sanding drums aid greatly in speeding up the shaping and roughing work. However final hand shaping and sanding produce the best results. Using a file, a half-round second-cut works great, shape your handle and bolster to desired shape, fitting to your hand. Sand with sandpapers, finishing with a 600 grit wet-dry. If a polished look is desired, buff with a muslin wheel and a white rouge.

    19. Remove masking tape, clean and sharpen your knife to a keen edge.

    YOUR CUSTOM KNIFE IS READY FOR USE.
  • Hidden Tangs with Guard and Pommel

    Round Tang Kits With Guard and Pommel

    Texas Bowie kit, Frontier Bowie kit  and Cape Skinner kit
    instructions can be applied to most round (hidden tang) blades

    MATERIALS:
    Blade
    Handle Material (comes pre-drilled in our kits)
    Guard and Pommel (supplied with kit)
    Epoxy  (We recommend Devcon 2-ton clear)
    Sandpaper,  (you will need an assortment of grits)
    Masking Tape.

    TOOLS
    Files
    Vise
    A sander and buffer will make the project easier, but is not completely necessary if you are a novice.

    PLEASE READ PROCEDURE CAREFULLY BEFORE YOU BEGIN.

    PROCEDURE

    1. Cover sharp edge of blade with masking tape.

    2. If necessary, deburr flat side of threaded tang area with a file so that guard will slide on tang. Only small amount of metal removal is required.

    3. Slide front guard onto tang.

    4. You may want to reshape the front guard to suit your personal taste, this can completely change the overall look of your completed knife.

    5. Slide handle material on the tang snugly up against the front guard. Check to see that your handle fits properly against the guard. If not, remove handle material as necessary by filing or sanding.

    6. Screw on pommel.

    7. Check to make sure handle material fits flatly and squarely against the pommel. If not, file and sand the handle material to fit.

    8. Scribe ends of handle material to shape of pommel, reshape pommel as desired.

    9. Determine shape and size desired for your custom handle. Disassemble and remove excess material with files, belt sander or any sanding power tool available. Be careful not to remove material closer than scribe marks for guards.

    10.  Fill hole with epoxy. Thin wood slivers may be used to help fill the area if desired. Reassemble using epoxy to hold all parts together. Screw end cap on as tightly as possible.

    ALLOW TO DRY OVERNIGHT

    11. Clean up any epoxy that may have seeped out, then clean and polish your handle.

    12. Remove masking tape and sharpen your blade to a keen edge.

    YOUR BLADE IS NOW READY TO USE.
  • Corby Rivets, Soldered Guards, Tubing

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING KITS WITH
    CORBY RIVETS AND SOLDERED SLOTTED GUARDS

    MATERIALS
    Blade
    Handle Material
    Slotted Guard
    Corby Rivets
    Thong Tubing
    Epoxy
    Sandpaper (200-600 grit)
    Masking Tape
    Stay Brite Solder Kit

    TOOLS
    Scribe
    Drill
    1/4" Drill bit
    7/32" Drill bit
    #RD3 Rivet Drill
    Files
    Jewelers Saw
    Vise
    Ball Pein Hammer
    Propane Torch

    Procedure

    1. Select materials and tools required for your custom knife. Read all instructions carefully before beginning.

    2. Sand flat the side of your guard that will fit next to the handle materials to insure a good fit. Pre-shape the guard front (the side next to the blade) and polish. Now scribe a pattern in the desired shape on the front of your guard to use later in shaping and finishing the guard and han- dle material into one. This is easier to do before you solder your guard piece to the blade.

    3. Slide guard onto blade checking for proper fit. It may be necessary to remove a small amount of material from each side of slot with a file to assure proper fitting. Guard should fit against blade tightly on all three sides.

    4. Solder guard to blade. We recommend a low temperature silver bearing solder such as our Stay-Brite. This adheres well to the guard and blade with little clean-up. Read instructions that come with your solder kit. Sand area of blade that will be soldered with 220 grit sandpaper. This will assure a good adhesion, (be careful not to sand or scratch any area that will not be covered.) Position guard on the blade and clamp into place. Place tang of blade into vise (knife point will be straight up), allow room to work torch on bottom side of guard. Place two pieces of solder (1/4" or so in length) on each side of the top of the guard touching blade. Stay-Brite flows at 450 degrees, be careful not to overheat as this may remove some of the hardness from your blade. Keep the heat 'up' away from blade area. Using a propane torch, heat the entire guard evenly. After the flux has boiled and the solder begins to flow, move the torch to the down side of the guard. Solder flows towards heat, so heating the underside will pull the sol- der into the joint between the blade and guard. It may be necessary to move the torch from one side of the guard to the other after the first side begins to flow. When all solder has flowed into joints, remove heat and allow to air cool for several minutes allowing the solder to harden. Remove clamp and check solder. When joint looks good with solder showing on both sides, you are ready for the next step.

    5. Cover sharp edge of blade with masking tape. This will protect you and the blade.

    6. Mark the side of your handle material that will fit next to tang being careful to match any color patterns that your material may contain. Mark end of each piece that will fit against guard.

    7. Fit handle material to guard by filing and sanding until you have a good square fit with NO GAPS or lines showing. Do both pieces.

    8. Lay blade on handle material carefully making sure it lays squarely and tightly against guard. Scribe outline of blade onto handle, (you may wish to clamp first so that handle will not slip.) Repeat with second piece of handle material using opposite side of the tang.

    9. Leaving slightly oversize, remove excess handle material with jewelers saw, belt sander or other means available. DO NOT OVERGRIND.

    10. Using 220 grit sandpaper, sand the handle material flat on the side that will fit against tang of blade. Sand tang of blade with same paper. This will remove any foreign material and assure a good adhesion of blade to handle material.

    11. Carefully attach one (1) piece of handle material to tang of blade with epoxy. Make sure the handle material is centered properly and that it fits perfectly against guard with no gaps. Clamp and allow epoxy to set. You may want to allow drying overnight.

    12. Using rivet holes in blade as a template, drill these holes with a 7/32" drill bit. Be sure to drill in center of holes, drill slowly and carefully so you will not splinter handle material, (a drill press is best if available.) EXTREME CAUTION is advised when using your blade as a pattern for drilling holes. Be sure the blade and handle materials are clamped securely and the blade is protected with tape to help protect the operator from being cut or otherwise injured if the drilling operation tries to twist or grab the work out of the vise.

    13. OPTIONAL THONG HOLE: If you wish to use a thong hole, drill this with a 1/4" bit, using blade hole as template.

    14. Repeat step 11 using second piece of han- dle material.

    15. Drill holes for rivets and thong hole (if desired) as in steps 12 & 13 using holes through handle material as guides. Holes must be drilled straight and properly centered for rivets to fit correctly.

    16. Counterbore rivet holes (a rivet drill works best). Set drill depth. You will want to use a scrap piece of wood to check and set proper depth.

    17. Insert rivets into handle material using two screwdrivers, screw the rivets together, adjusting as necessary to completely close the handle material against the blade. A small amount of epoxy may be wiped on the rivets prior to inserting to add to the hold. The heads of the rivets are filed or sanded away removing the screw slots when the handle is being finished.

    18. You are now ready to shape your guard and handle into one. Power tools such as belt sanders and Dremel tools with sanding drums aid greatly in speeding up the shaping and roughing work. However final hand shaping and sanding produce the best results. Using a file, a half-round, second-cut works great, shape your handle and guard to desired shape, fitting to your hand. Sand with sandpapers, finishing with a 600 grit wet-dry. If a polished look is desired, buff with a muslin wheel and a white rouge.

    19. Remove masking tape, clean and sharpen your knife to a keen edge.

    YOUR BLADE IS READY TO USE
  • Corby Rivets, Slotted Guards, Tubing

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING KITS WITH
    CORBY RIVETS AND PINNED SLOTTED GUARDS

    MATERIALS
    Blade
    Handle Material
    Slotted Guard w/pin
    Corby Rivets
    Thong Tubing
    Epoxy
    Sandpaper (200-600 grit)
    Masking Tape

    TOOLS
    Scribe
    Drill
    1/4" Drill bit
    7/32" Drill bit
    #RD3 Rivet Drill
    Files
    Jewelers Saw
    Vise
    Ball Pein Hammer

    PROCEDURE

    1. Select materials and tools required for your custom knife. Read all instructions carefully before beginning.

    2. Sand flat the side of your guard that will fit next to the handle material to insure a good fit. Pre-shape the guard front (the side next to the blade) and polish. Now scribe a pattern in the desired shape on the front of your guard to use later in shaping and finishing the guard and han- dle material into one. This is easier to do before you solder your guard piece to the blade.

    3. Cover sharp edge of blade with masking tape. This will protect you and the blade.

    4. Fit your guard by aligning rivet hole in guard and blade. The guards are slightly oversize, therefore a small amount of material must be removed from each side with a file or sandpaper until guard is precisely fitted to slot on blade and holes are aligned. Center hole must be square with the slot. Pin guard to blade making sure pin protrudes equally from both sides. If guard does not fit tightly to blade (if any gap shows) it will be necessary to clamp at top of guard before going to step 5.

    5. Pein pin to guard by placing firmly on anvil. Pein one side then the other, alternating sides until pin has "sculled" out inside the hole making a very tight fit. As you work down your guard, the metals will mesh and you will not see the pin at all, the guard will appear as one piece.

    6. Mark the side of your handle material that will fit next to tang being careful to match any color patterns that your material may contain. Mark end of each piece that will fit against guard.

    7. Fit handle material to guard by filling and sanding until you have a good square fit with NO GAPS or lines showing. Do both pieces.

    8. Lay blade on handle material carefully making sure it lays squarely and tightly against guard. Scribe outline of blade onto handle, (you may wish to clamp first so that handle will not slip.) Repeat with second piece of handle material using opposite side of the tang.

    9. Leaving slightly oversize, remove excess handle material with jewelers saw, belt sander or other means available.

    DO NOT OVERGRIND.

    10. Using 220 grit sandpaper, sand the handle material flat on the side that will fit against tang of blade. Sand tang of blade with sand paper. This will remove any foreign material and assure a good adhesion of blade to handle material.

    11. Carefully attach one (1) piece of handle material to tang of blade with epoxy. Make sure the handle material is centered properly and that it fits perfectly against guard with no gaps. Clamp and allow epoxy to set. You may want to allow drying overnight.

    12. Using rivet holes in blade as a template, drill these holes with a 7/32" drill bit. Be sure to drill in center holes, drill slowly and carefully so you will not splinter handle material, (a drill press is best if available). EXTREME CAUTION is advised when using your blade as a pattern for drilling holes. Be sure the blade is protected with tape to help protect the operator from being cut or otherwise injured if the drilling operation tries to twist or grab the work out of the vise.

    13. OPTIONAL THONG HOLE: If you wish to use a thong hole, drill with a 1/4" bit using blade hole as template.

    14. Repeat step 11 using second piece of handle material.

    15. Drill holes for rivets and thong hole (if desired) as in steps 12 & 13 using holes through handle material as guides. Holes must be drilled straight and properly centered for rivets to fit correctly.

    16. Counterbore rivet holes. Set drill depth. You will want to use a scrap piece of wood to check and set proper depth.

    17. Insert rivets into handle material using two screwdrivers, screw the rivets together, adjust- ing as necessary to completely close the handle material against the blade. A small amount of epoxy may be wiped on the rivets prior to inserting to add to the hold. The heads of the rivets are filed or sanded away removing the screw slots when the handle is being finished.

    18. You are now ready to shape your guard and handle into one. Power tools such as belt sanders and Dremel tools with sanding drums aid greatly in speeding up the shaping and roughing work. However final hand shaping and sanding produce best results. Using a file, a half-round, second-cut works great, shape your handle and guard to desired shape, fitting to your hand. Sand with sandpapers, finishing with a 600 grit wet-dry. If a polished look is desired buff with a muslin wheel and a white rouge.

    19. Remove masking tape, clean and sharpen your knife to a keen edge.

    YOUR BLADE IS NOW READY TO USE.
  • Tapered Tang Blades with Pinned Guards & Handles

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR TAPER-TANG BLADES

    1. Select Materials and tools required for your project. Read procedure carefully.

    2. Cover sharp edge of blade with masking tape. This will protect you and the blade.

    3. Fit your guard by aligning pin hole in guard and blade. Pin guard to blade making sure pin protrudes equally from both sides. If guard does not fit tightly to blade (if any gap shows) it will be necessary to clamp at top of guard before going to step 4.

    4. Pein pin to guard by placing firmly on anvil. Pein one side then the other, alternating sides until pin has "sculled" out inside the hole making a very tight fit. As you work down your guard, the metals will mesh and you will not see the pin at all, the guard will appear as one piece. Reshape guard & tang as desired.

    5. Mark the side of your handle material that will fit next to tang being careful to match any color patterns that your material may contain. Mark end of each piece that will fit against guard.

    6. Fit handle material to guard by filing and sanding until you have a good square fit with NO GAPS or lines showing. Do both pieces.

    7. Lay blade on handle material carefully making sure it lays squarely and tightly against guard. Scribe outline of blade onto handle, (you may want to clamp first so that handle will not slip.) Repeat with second piece of handle material using opposite side of the tang.

    8. Leaving slightly oversize, remove excess handle material with jewelers saw, belt sander or other means available.
    DO NOT OVERGRIND.

    9. Using 220 grit sandpaper, sand the handle mated- al flat on the side that will fit against tang of blade. Sand tang of blade with same paper. This will remove any foreign material and assure a good adhesion of blade to handle material.

    10. Carefully attach one (1) piece of handle material to tang of blade with epoxy. Make sure the handle material is centered properly and that it fits perfectly against guard with no gaps. Clamp and allow epoxy to set. You may want to allow drying overnight.

    11. Using pin holes in blade as a template, drill these holes with the proper drill bit. Be sure to drill in center of holes, drill slowly and carefully so you will not splin- ter handle material, (a drill press is best if available.) EXTREME CAUTION is advised when using your blade as a pattern for drilling holes. Be sure the blade and handle materials are clamped securely and the blade is protected with tape to help protect the opera- tor from being cut or otherwise injured if the drilling operation tries to twist or grab the work out of the vise.

    12. OPTIONAL THONG HOLE: If you wish to use a thong hole, drill this hole using blade hole as tem- plate.

    13. Repeat step 10 using second piece of handle material.

    14. Drill holes for pins and thong hole (it desired) as in steps 11 & 12 using holes through handle material as guides. Holes must be drilled straight and properly centered for pins to fit correctly.

    15. Insert pins through holes drilled in handle materi- al. It may be necessary to polish your pins and thong hole tubing with emery cloth to assure they will slide in and out of the holes easily. They should be snug, but not tight enough to risk cracking the wood when pushing in or out.

    16. Mix a small amount of epoxy. Roll pins and thong hole tubing (if installing) in epoxy. Insert pins in holes. Allow to dry until set. Excess pin material will be sand- ed off when shaping and buffing handle.

    17. You are now ready to shape your guard and han- dle into one. Power tools such as belt sanders and Dremel tools with sanding drums aid greatly in speed- ing up the shaping and roughing work. However, final hand shaping and sanding produce the best results. Using a file, a half-round, second-cut works great, shape your handle and guard to desired shape, fitting to your hand. Sand with sandpapers, finishing with a 600 grit wet-dry. If a polished look is desired, buff with a muslin wheel and a white rouge.

    18. Remove masking tape, clean and sharpen your knife to a keen edge.

    19. With the blade in the halfway position, insert two strips of .002 shim stock until touching the hinge pin, one on each side of your blade, under the bolster and liner. You might want to counter- sink the hinge pin hole a small amount on the bolster to avoid the pin loosening. Pein the hinge pin. You may want to remove shims and check the blade from time to time for tightness. Be sure it is tight enough to work well with no side play, but not so tight that your blade binds up.

    20. Remove the shim stock.

    21. Using a tapered punch and hammer, gently expand the thong hole tubing piece to fill the hole. This is done by placing the tapered part of the punch into the hole and gently peining to expand the tubing. Tap gently and use care to avoid cracking handle material.

    22. Carefully operate your blade to check for fit. It may be necessary to pein pins a little more. The locking lever must not be too tight or it will bind up. Now pein any remaining pins.

    23. Polish and buff your blade as follows:

    A. Leave blade as is if a satin finish is desired.

    B. Bring to a mirror finish by sanding with 220, 320, 400 and 500 grit emery cloth, then buff using a soft wheel and white rouge.

    24. Buff handle and blade with white compound on a muslin wheel. This will bring the handle material to a shining luster.

    YOUR BLADE IS NOW READY TO USE.
  • Lockback Folder Kits

    LockBack Folder Kits

    MATERIALS
    Lockback Kit
    Handle Material
    Epoxy
    Inletting Black
    Masking Tape
    Sandpaper (200-600 grit)

    TOOLS
    Drill
    Drill Bits (see Chart)
    8 oz. Ball Pein Hammer
    Vise
    Files
    Jewelers Saw .002 shimstock
    Wire Cutters

    Procedure

    1. When using Dymondwood, match the handle material you have chosen so that identical color patterns are to the outside of the blade. Some materials have a color combination that is obvi- ous (such as red on one side and black on the other) other materials must be studied carefully to assure a good match.

    2. Sand one side of each piece of handle material that will be fitted against the knife line so that it is true and flat. This is important to assure a good adhesion when you epoxy the handle material to the liner of your lockblacle.

    3. Sand one side of each piece of handle material, so that it lays flat against the bolster of your lockblacle. On lockblacles with bolsters at both ends fit before drilling holes. Rough out using a pattern cut from paper, one for each side. The pattern can be glued to the outside of your han- dle material then cut with a jewelers saw. You should cut your handle material a little oversize to allow for proper fitting. Fit by removing a small amount at a time with a file or sandpaper. You can use inletting black to tell where to remove excess material.

    4. Mix epoxy (30 minute, 2-ton epoxy is best). Coat the outside of each liner and the side of the handle material to be glued to the liner.

    5. Carefully attach one piece of handle material to a liner. Make sure handle material is centered straight with the grain and aligned with the bol- ster(s). Clamp securely with C-clamps and blocks. Make sure you do not squeeze the epoxy out by clamping too tightly.

    6. Follow this procedure for both liners.

    ALLOW TO DRY FOR 24 HRS.

    7. Place handle material and liner in a vise and using a file, (a halfround, bastard cut works

    great!) file the outside edge of the handle mater- ial to match the shape of the liners, This proce- dure can also be easily accomplished with a belt sander or a Dremel tool using 1/2" sanding bands.

    8. Contour the handle material to the desired shape, rounding edges with your file and then sandpaper. After shaping to the desired effect, finish with 220, 400 then 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper.

    9. With the liner up, carefully drill through the first hole in the liner and continue to drill all the way through the handle material. Your first holes should be the countersink holes that hold the handle to the liner, (these holes do not attach to any of the inner workings of your knife). If possible, use a drill press and vise for this procedure as you must make sure the holes are drilled straight and not at an angle. The second hole drilled should be at the opposite end of the liner as the first. With two holes drilled and pinned, (see step 11) you can drill the remaining holes for pins and thong hole tubing.

    10. Drill holes on second liner and handle material in the same manner.

    11. Pin handle to the liner through the countersink holes. It may be necessary to pein a small head on the pin to fit the countersink. With liner and pin head on a flat surface, (an anvil, for instance) pein pins with a 4 oz. hammer. Peining pins must be done gently and carefully. Tap pin on one side of handle, then turn over and tap on the other side of your liner. Continue this procedure until pins are properly tightened. It may be necessary to polish your pins and thong hole tubing with emery cloth to assure that they slide in and out of the holes easily. The pins should be snug, but not tight enough to risk cracking the wood when pushing in or out. Strike gently many times to enlarge the pin in its hole. File off excess protrusions on inside of liner.

    NOTE: SOME RODS MUST BE CUT TO BE USED AS TWO OR MORE PINS IN SOME BLADES. DETERMINE PROPER LENGTH BEFORE CUTTING

    12. Lay handle material and liner, bolster down, on your worktable.

    13. Place pin through the locking lever and liner.

    14. Place pin through the spring retainer(s) and liner.

    15. Place pin through the blade and liner. The locking lever should be fitted into the lock notch on the blade.

    16. Attach the second liner and handle material. Clamp together and grind off pins so they can be peined. Do not pein at this time. All pins except the hinge pin (located on the front bol- ster), should be ground so that about .015 is showing on each side. The hinge pin should be left with approximately 1/16" on each side. Check for proper operation before final pinning. If blade does not lock or release properly, it may be necessary to remove a small amount of metal from the notch or locking lever. Be sure you know what to do before you attempt this. Removal of too much metal could ruin your lock- blade.

    17. Pein rear pins using the same procedure as for the countersink holes.

    18. Push out the locking lever pin about 3/32" and put a SMALL amount of epoxy into the recessed hole. Do the same on the other side. Pein on each side lightly, one side then the other until tight in holes. Be careful not to get them too tight or the locking lever will blind up.

    YOUR BLADE IS READY TO USE!
  • Semi Finished Sheath Instructions

    Forming and finishing your Custom sheath
    Every Custom Knife deserves a well fitted and handsomely finished custom sheath
    The sheath you have purchased is constructed from top grain vegetable tanned cowhide.

    IMPORTANT:  Please read All Instructions before beginning.   Finishing options must be followed in the order shown or the desired finish may not be achieved.  Your sheath needs special care – the pores of the leather are open and will absorb any dirt, oil or other chemicals it comes in contact with.  Before starting any leather project:
    WASH YOUR HANDS WITH HOT SOAPY WATER AND KEEP THEM CLEAN.   We recommend wearing surgical gloves while forming and finishing your sheath.

    Prepare your completed knife
      Oil your blade with a good water displacing oil (sheath or magic coat work very well) then wrap the complete knife securely in Heavy Plastic wrap, sealing tightly so that moisture will not enter and harm your blade.  Insert wrapped blade into sheath.
    Install snap on Strap style sheath
    With your knife fitting firmly in the sheath, pull strap tightly around knife and mark where the snap will be   installed.  Remove knife and use the #OS2290 snap setter to install the supplied line 24 snap.  
    Case your Sheath.
    Fill a container with clean HOT tap water – Completely immerse the EMPTY sheath into the hot tap water,
    Wetting thoroughly - about one or two minutes, then remove immediately.  
    Form fit your sheath
    Re-insert your wrapped knife into the sheath as far as possible. Press firmly but carefully, do not force the blade with excessive pressure, however it must fit snugly.  Begin to mold the damp leather with your hands around each area of the knife taking special care to press and form around blade, guard area and finger groves.  Continue to Mold and Shape pressing with fingers to fit tightly so the Sheath will hold the knife snugly in all areas.  Concentrate on keeping the stitching straight and do not forget the belt loop and straps if applicable.   As you work,  the natural color of the leather will return and your sheath will regain some ‘stiffness’ when you are satisfied with the shape and appearance of your formed sheath, allow the sheath to set about ten minutes, check carefully to make sure the sheath is molded and formed to your liking, if not make any desired adjustments at this time.  You may need to case (wet) your sheath again, if so, do not forget to remove your knife first. When satisfied continue to the next step.
    Allow your sheath to thoroughly dry
    Remove the knife from your sheath.  UNWRAP, CLEAN, APPLY OIL OR WAX TO PROTECT FROM ANY MOISTURE CONTACTED DURING THE FORMING PROCESS.  Allow your sheath to dry thoroughly; this may       take from 4 to 24 hours. It must dry completely.  You can hang in the sunshine or place in a warm area to speed this process:    DO NOT HEAT IN OVEN!
           
        Finishing your sheath       If coloring of leather is desired, this must be applied prior to oiling.
    A. If you wish to color your sheath choose a professional oil dye or antique finish and apply according to the manufacturer’s directions.  Our dyes can be mixed to make special colors, dye reducer is helpful in diluting and color mixing.  Edge coat is applied to the edges to darken and produce a ‘finished’ look smoothing the fibers.  Continue following instructions.
    B. A natural finish is produced by applying Neatsfoot oil directly to the molded, dried sheath.  This oil will absorb completely into the leather conditioning and preserving your leather in its molded state.  It will also slightly darken the leather naturally, the more coats you apply the darker sheen it will produce.  Apply a minimum of four heavy coats of this oil with wool daubers then work the oil into the leather with your hands making sure it is completely coated. Be sure to keep the sewn edge straight and open the belt loop and strap to apply the oil evenly and completely to every part of the sheath.    Dry 4-6 hours.  You may wish to apply edge dye for a finished look, we suggest brown for a natural color sheath.
    C. Leather Balm adds a nice luster after application of neatsfoot oil.                
    4-Way conditioner will keep your leather clean and conditioned.
  • Kydex Forming Instructions

    HOW TO MAKE A SHEATH USING KYDEX SHEATH MATERIAL

    1. Make a pattern for your sheath and test to make sure it will fit properly.  You can make a 1 or 2 piece sheath. You will need to leave a ¼ to 3/8” seam allowance for the glued or riveted edge.

    2. Using your pattern, cut the Kydex using a scroll saw or jewelers saw.

    3. Kydex becomes pliable at 300 degrees F. Heat with a heat gun or a 1500 watt hair dryer will work nicely. When hot, mold to shape wearing heat resistant gloves. Work quickly as it cools quickly. If you are not satisfied, reheat and try again.

    4. Glue seams with any good contact cement according to manufacturers instructions. If desired, drill holes and insert any type leather rivets to further hold seams.

    5. Sand and smooth cut edges as desired.

    TECHNICAL INFORMATION: CEMENTING KYDEX TO KYDEX

    Due to its excellent chemical resistance, Kydex can be more difficult to cement than other plastics. Strong bonds can be obtained for most applications using the following methods:

    1. The best joints can be obtained  using a viscous solvent cement consisting of about 10%  Kydex shavings or sawdust dissolved in a 50-50 mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), the Kydex shavings should be dissolved in the straight THF first before adding the appropriate amount of MEK.  Both of these solvents are available from lab supply companies such as Fisher Scientific, Aldrich Chemicals, or other chemical distributors.

    2. Without the Kydex shavings, a relatively fast acting capillary adhesive can be made by using only the 50-50 THF and MEK mixture. THF works well at 100%, but it tends to flash off too quickly resulting in a poor joint. Addition of MEK slows down the evaporation rate and affords greater time to work with the joint.

    3. A premixed thickened, THF gel cement can be obtained from IPS Weld On. The phone number is 1-800-421-2677.
  • Guard Solder Instructions

    Stay-Brite Solder Kit

    - Five times stronger than ordinary solder
    - Flows freely and smoothly
    - Solders all metals
    - Vibration and stress resistant
    - Retains bright finish, similar to stainless             steel

    High strength silver-bearing solder melts and flows at 430 degrees F. Provides strength without the distortion caused by high temperature brazing.

    Tensile strength 10,000 to 25,000 P.S.I.
    Elongation: 49%. Vibration resistant.

    DIRECTIONS FOR TORCH SOLDERING:
    Apply Stay-Clean soldering flux to parts to be soldered. Stay-Clean removes all oxides, preparing the metals for soldering.  Heat the parts and apply Stay-Brite silver solder. When melting of the Stay-Brite first occurs, withdraw flame slightly, and continue heating slowly until solder has flowed to all points.
    After solder has hardened, area may be rinsed with water.

    WARNING! Stay-Clean flux contains zinc chloride. Avoid contact with skin, eyes and mucous membranes. For eyes, flush with water and get immediate medical attention. If swallowed, give plenty of water or milk. Call physician immediately.
  • Fiber Board Sharpening Wheel Instructions

    JANTZ PROFESSIONAL KNIFE SHARPENING WHEELS

    INSTRUCTIONS
    READ CAREFULLY BEFORE USING!!!!

    PREPARE YOUR WHEELS
    1.  The silicon gritted wheel is for sharpening.  Apply a very light touch of lubricant (pink grease) to help protect from heat buildup.  Be careful not to over lubricate, as this can clog the grit and prevent the cutting process necessary for sharpening.  

    2.  Use a piece of scrap metal to remove any extra lubricant and excess silicon grit.  An old knife or worn file works well for this process.  

    3.  Apply white rouge to the slotted polishing wheel by holding stick of compound lightly to the wheel as it turns on the motor shaft.  The compound should melt onto the wheel.  Re-apply as necessary, do not use the wheel without a good base of compound on the wheel.  

     Recondition Wheels As Needed:
    When the sharpening wheel stops cutting, it is time to recondition!
    With motor running, use 80 grit no-fil sandpaper to remove any remaining grease, grit, and glue.  Take care not to damage the wheel by cutting into the wheel or sanding beyond the surface.  Follow with 600 grit sandpaper to smooth and clean wheel.  Pour silicon grit onto paper.  Coat wheel lightly and evenly with sizing glue.  Roll wheel in silicon grit covering completely.  Lightly tap edge to remove excess grit and make sure all wheel is coated evenly.  Allow to dry completely (we suggest overnight).  If slots in your finishing wheel fill up, clean with a hacksaw blade or other thin blade edge.

    MAKE SURE WHEEL TURNS DOWN AND AWAY FROM YOU

    NEVER PULL YOUR KNIFE OFF OF THE EDGE OF THE WHEEL ~ LIFT UP

    NEVER TURN THE KNIFE EDGE INTO THE WHEEL

    USE EYE PROTECTION

    WEAR PROPER CLOTHING


    TO SHARPEN YOUR KNIFE:

    Place your knife edge on the grit wheel at a 20degree angle.  Using a light, even pressure, pull the entire length of the knife edge lightly across the wheel.  Repeat this process an even number of times on each side of the blade until metal binding appears on the edge.  Now switch to the slotted polishing wheel prepared with rouge.  Using moderate pressure, buff each side until the metal edge is removed.  






    !!  REMEMBER  !!
    NEVER TURN THE EDGE OF THE BLADE INTO THE WHEEL
  • Polishing Tips

    This booklet will help you decide which wheels and compounds are right for your job. The choices seem to be overwhelming, but keep in mind that to achieve the desired results polishing is usually a multiple step process. Determining how many steps are right for you will come with experience. We suggest you start with the finest compounds possible to do the job quickly and easily. You do not want to remove more material than necessary, but at the same time you do not want to spend three hours doing a fifteen minute job. The best way to learn is to experiment. You will want to start with a few pieces of scrap that you can play with to become familiar with the different compounds and how they cut or polish.
    COMPOUNDS
    • GREASELESS: Available in two types - plasticlad solid or brush on paste. Both are glue based and have a shelf life of 6-8 months. Special care should be taken to preserve these compounds. Most commonly used on muslin or felt wheels. When buffing aluminum with greaseless compounds always use LUBAR lubricant to keep the material from tearing out.
    1) PLASTICLAD SOLID: Available in grits ranging from 80 (coarsest) to 600 (finest). 80 grit plasticlad is very coarse and is used to remove deep scratches, rust and pits. 120 and 150 grits are coarse, used to remove rust, pits and scratches or buff marks left by the 80 grit. 200 and 240 are medium cutting compounds used to remove light rust and scratches quickly. 300 and 400 are light cutting compounds which will only remove small amounts of metal. 600 grit is a cleanup compound used mostly to remove wear marks from steel and brass.
    2) BRUSH-ON: Available in grits ranging from 150-800. Lasts 4-5 times longer than Plasticlad once setup on the wheel, but must dry a minimum of 3-4 hours after being applied to the wheel.
    • GREASE BASED COMPOUNDS: Medium to fine compounds, 3-5 year self life.
    1) EMERY: Black compound used for cutting. Use this compound when cutting action is desired but you do not need the power of fast cutting greaseless compounds.
    2) CUT AND COLOR BARS: Available in medium and fine grades, these compounds have enough cutting power to achieve a dull satin finish using sisal wheels. Most often used to remove the scratches left behind by greaseless compounds.
    3) BOBBING & CROCUS: Fast cutting compound often used on wooden laps, leather or brushes as well as felt and muslin wheels. Used to achieve a scratch free dull finish.
    4) TRIPOLI: Cutting compound used extensively on brass, copper, aluminum, forgings, plastic and other similar materials. Follow with the blending bar to remove fine scratches.
    5) BLENDING BAR: Closely related to the Cut and Color bar, this compound will remove very fine scratches. The blending bar is used primarily on a muslin wheel to achieve a bright satin finish.
    6) WHITE ROUGE: Many projects call for a bright mirror finish, this is achieved with rouge. White rouge is the most popular of all buffing compounds. It is a general use compound used on carbon based steel, plastic, brass, fiberglass as well as other materials.
    7) GREEN ROUGE: The perfect finish for stainless steel, brass bronze and nickel silver.
    8) YELLOW ROUGE: Faster cutting rouge very popular for use on brass, bronze, copper and nickel silver.
    9) JEWELERS ROUGE: Non-abrasive. Produces a lustrous finish on precious metals.
    • FABULUSTRE & ZAM: These specialty compounds are perfect for use on precious stones and metals. Will not discolor. Fabulustre is a dry compound which leaves very little residue. Zam leaves an invisible protective coating.
    • POWDERS: Used for hand rubbed finishes.
    1) ALUMINUM OXIDE: Grits ranging from 150-800 most used to achieve a no line satin finish, cut with water to make a fine paste.
    2) PUMICE: For use on steel. 80, used for scrubbing. 150 used for cleanup. 200, used for polishing.
    3) TIN OXIDE: Mix with olive oil to polish glass, crystal, Plexiglas and fine plastics.
    WHEELS
    There are many things you need to know your wheels. The most important things to remember are to have a different wheel for each compound and always run the wheel in the same direction. Use a permanent marker to mark the wheel direction as well as the compound type on your wheel the first time you use it to avoid errors.
    • MUSLIN BUFFS: Made of high grade processed cotton. The versatility of these wheels make them very popular for general purpose use.
    1) SEWN MUSLIN: Sewn muslin wheels can be used with virtually any compound making them the most versatile wheel made. Available in 1/4" or 3/4" wide and can be stacked for wider applications.
    2) LOOSE MUSLIN: Used for final finish and cleanup. Also used without rouge to remove residue left after completing your buffing project.
    3) POLISHING WHEEL: Super hard sewed and glued muslin wheel with canvas cover on each side for added strength. Most commonly used with greaseless compounds and cut and color bars.
    • SISAL WHEELS: Special wheels for use with cut and color bars. DO NOT attempt to use these wheels with greaseless compounds or rouge. They will not hold compounds other than the cut and color bars. When loaded with the cut and color compounds, these wheels will whisk away light scratches leaving your work virtually scratch free, however, they leave a dull satin finish. Sisal wheels are 3/8" thick and can be stacked and glued for desired thickness.
    • FELT WHEELS: Available in soft, medium and hard density. Soft felt wheels are very good on rounded surfaces and jobs requiring very little pressure or cutting action. Medium felt wheels adapt well to both flat and round surfaces and are most commonly used in the knife making industry. Hard felt wheels are most often used on flat surfaces or where it is necessary to use heavy pressure to contour the wheel to the surface of your project. Work well with greaseless compounds. Not recommended for use with rouges as felt wheels tend to burn with these compounds.
    • SATIN BRIGHT WHEELS: Used to remove light surface imperfections and blend finishes. Can be used wet or dry and can be washed free of contaminates after use. DO NOT apply any compound or rouge to a satin bright wheel.
    • FLAP WHEELS: Used for satin finish on steel, aluminum, brass and hard plastics.
    • EXP WHEELS: Aggressive, fast cutting, yet leaves a bright finish on hard materials such as steel and titanium.
    • CRATEX: Silicon carbide imbedded rubber available in 46, 90, 120 and 240 grit, used to polish, cut and blend scratches all in one operation.
    • WIRE WHEELS: Used for cleanup, surface conditioning and deburring on heavy rust. Used to remove scale after heat treating blades. Available in .008 or .014 wire gauges.
    BUFFING ACCESSORIES & SAFETY EQUIPMENT
    • WHEEL RAKE: Used to remove access buffing compound from muslin and sisal wheels. DO NOT use on felt or satin bright wheels.
    • LUBAR: Lubricant used over greaseless compounds to avoid friction and heat build up. A must with aluminum to avoid tear out.
    • FACE SHIELD OR SAFETY GLASSES: Always wear eye protection to avoid dust particles and sparks.
    • DUST MASK OR RESPIRATOR: Protect your nose and lungs from harmful dust when buffing.
    • GLOVES: Wear gloves when buffing, this not only protects your hands but also makes cleanup easier.
    • PROPER CLOTHING: Avoid loose fitting clothing, ties, jewelry or other items which could get caught in the action. Proper shoes are a must.

    1800 OR 3600 RPM? This has to be the most common question when it comes to buffing. It is also the most difficult to answer. 1800 rpm is safer for most operations, such as buffing a knife. Taking your time to remove the correct amount of material from the right places means all the difference in the finished product. Remember you can't put the steel back on the blade after you grind it off. Another advantage 1800 rom has over 3600 is friction and the buildup of heat. Plastics and epoxy melt with high surface speeds, so be careful! The 3600 rpm buffer has a place in the picture too. When working down rough pieces nothing beats the speed of a 3600 rpm buffer with a greaseless compound.
    WHAT SIZE WHEELS DO I NEED? You should check with the manufacturer of your buffer for the maximum wheel diameter for your machine. Remember the larger the wheel the faster the surface of the wheel is moving, bigger is not always better.
    WHAT DO I DO IF MY WHEELS GET DIRTY? Most contaminated wheels can be cleaned with a wheel rake or you can move them down to the next grit. Remember you can never use a wheel for more than one compound, once you have put 80 grit greaseless into o the wheel it is there forever. you can however put 120 grit onto a 240 grit wheel, it just becomes a 120 grit wheel forever.
    WHAT IS THE BLACK STUFF? After buffing you will see black residue on whatever you have been buffing. This is buffing compound, typically rouge. You can either wash the object with water, keep a clean buff to remove the residue, or dry buff by hand with a clean towel.
    TYPICAL BUFFING PROCEDURE
    Although every job will not be the same, it seems logical that we give some guidance to get you started. The following procedure utilizes the contents of the wheel and compound kit and shows a basic outline of a typical buffing operation.
    1) 80 or150 grit greaseless compound on a felt or polishing muslin wheel to remove rust, scale and pits.
    2) 200 or 240 grit greaseless compound on a sewn muslin wheel to remove scratches created in step 1.
    3) 300 or 320 grot greaseless compound on a sewn muslin wheel to remove scratches created in step 2
    4) 400 or 600 grit greaseless compound on a sewn muslin wheel to remove scratches created in step 3.
    5) Cut and color bar on sisal wheels to blend scratches from step 4. This will leave a dull fine line satin finish.
    6) Blending bar on a polishing or sewn muslin wheel to brighten and remove fine scratches created in step 5.
    7) White rouge on a loose muslin wheel to create a mirror finish
    8) wipe down with a clean dry cloth to remove any compound residue.